Rose-Adorned Crosses in Quito

On Palm Sunday, crosses throughout Quito were adorned with local roses of all colors. If you would prefer to see these in a slideshow, please click on a single photo to begin.

A Quiteño Palm Sunday

The Virgin Mary making her way to the stage.

The Virgin Mary making her way to the stage.

A week before Easter Sunday, the Catholic Community in Quito celebrates Palm Sunday by congregating in the Plaza San Francisco. They set up a huge stage where the festivities begin at 11am. A procession appeared from no where and pushed through the gathering crowd. We were fortunate to be on the side of the plaza where the procession arrived and I hurriedly snapped photos of the Virgin Mary, of Joseph leading an adult Jesus on a donkey, and of everyday Quiteños carrying branches of rosemary and native grasses in bouquets meant to replace traditional palm branches, now an endangered species.

The plaza was awash with people. The sun was shining brightly and many plaid umbrellas protected people from the harsh rays. In fact, I think the umbrella man made a healthy profit on this beautiful sunny day.

The crowd was transient, moving throughout the morning depending on the events at the time. Most listened carefully to the priests as they took turns speaking from the grand stage. At one point, there was a solid and consistent river of people flowing up the steps from the plaza towards the Cathedral where a pair of priests were blessing the crowd with holy water. Some received the sacrament at the top of the steps. Others were just content to watch the goings on from the walkway up above the plaza. Children sat with legs over the edges, baseball caps fell from on high, and the crowd in general was just content to be. Several people sat across the street, hiding in the little bit of shade made by centuries old buildings and putting up with the tour buses and the taxis that occasionally impeded their view.

As the official ceremonies ended, the fun really began. Children in costumes from all over Ecuador took turns taking to the stage. They danced and danced and danced in front of a crowd of proud parents and grandparents and tourists like myself. Ecuadorians love their children and the exclamations of Qué lindo! Qué bonito! Chévere! abounded. People flocked to take pictures along side kids, whether they knew them or not. And the majority of the children smiled so brightly that they outshone the bright sun that afternoon.

Truthfully, we were leery of heading downtown and facing the crowds but after the day was done, I had nothing but great memories! The crowd was huge but never felt overwhelming. And even when I was crammed in the middle, I never felt unsafe. Perhaps this is because I am tall here. At 5 foot 4 inches, I was still able to see where I was headed even when surrounded by locals. And everyone was accepting on this day. Gringos or no, we felt welcomed and though we stuck out like sore thumbs, no one seemed to mind.

If you would like to view these as a slideshow, just click on any of the photos!

Applesauce Spice Bread – Typically American

Applesauce Spice Bread, freshly sliced.

Applesauce Spice Bread, freshly sliced.

The United States is a melting pot of cultures and we have a food history that is anything but stereotypical. I have friends that hate the fact the only thing we’re known for are hamburgers, hot-dogs, and maybe apple pie. We can’t even really lay claim to some of the most typical foods I grew up with – lasagna (Italian), lumpia (Filipino), Yorkshire Pudding (English). And I think most of us can say the same. Our food culture is a mixed bag.

However, when I’m asked to bring a typically American food to an event, I have to come up with something. An easy option, that isn’t well known in other countries, is some kind of quick bread. I usually fall back on a couple of favorites. One is Banana Bread, a recipe I shared a few weeks back. The other is Applesauce Spice Bread. The great thing about quick bread recipes is that they don’t have to be baked in a loaf pan. If you want them to look like a cake, bake them in a cake pan. If you need to serve a lot of people without a mess, bake them in mini-muffin tins. Sharing with kids at school? Go for the bigger muffin size. These recipes are flexible and that’s one of the reasons I love them so much!

The following recipe is from Deborah Madison’s Vegetarian Cooking for Everyday. It’s a recipe I haven’t found the need to adjust. In fact, I love her book so much it is literally falling apart. It might be time to start looking for a replacement!

Ingredients for Applesauce Spice Bread

Ingredients for Applesauce Spice Bread

Applesauce Spice Bread
(all pictures, except for the final loaf, show a double batch)

1/4 pound (1 stick) butter
1/2 cup white sugar
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 eggs, room temperature
1 cup of applesauce*
2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp cinnamon or cardamom
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp ground cloves

Note: I did not change this recipe for altitude and it worked fine

*I use homemade applesauce. Take 8-10 medium apples. Quarter and place in a saucepan large enough to hold them. Add 1/4 water or apple juice. Bring to a simmer, turn to low, cover with lid and let cook until apples are soft. Let cool. Run the mixture through a food mill that separates the skin and seeds from the puree. You’ll have plenty of applesauce for this recipe plus leftovers to eat however you like best!

Cream the butter and two sugars until fluffy.

Cream the butter and two sugars until fluffy.

Add each egg one at a time and beat well.

Add each egg one at a time and beat well.

Add the baking soda to the applesauce and then watch as the magic happens!

Add the baking soda to the applesauce and then watch as the magic happens!

Make sure your container is large enough for foaming applesauce. The chemical reaction is fun for kids.

Make sure your container is large enough for foaming applesauce. The chemical reaction is fun for kids.

Stir the applesauce/baking soda mixture to the batter.

Stir the applesauce/baking soda mixture to the batter.

Add the flour, salt and spices, using a sift if anything looks lumpy.

Add the flour, salt and spices, using a sift if anything looks lumpy.

Stir well until you no longer see any flour. Your batter is ready to place in the baking pan of your choice.

Stir well until you no longer see any flour. Your batter is ready to place in the baking pan of your choice.

In a standard size loaf pan, bake for about 50 minutes. The smaller the size baking pan, the less time you will need. When the bread is finished, a toothpick should come out clean. Also, the bread should have a nice brown crust.

In a standard size loaf pan, bake for about 50 minutes at 350 degrees Farenheit. The smaller the size baking pan, the less time you will need. When the bread is finished, a toothpick should come out clean. Also, the bread should have a nice brown crust.